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CREDIT: Courtesy Museum of Natural History

Nature

Giant 9,000-Pound Amethyst Rock Goes On Display In New York Museum

Giant 9,000-Pound Amethyst Rock Goes On Display In New York Museum

A giant amethyst rock, weighing over 9000 pounds, will be exhibited in a newly refurbished section of The American Museum of Natural History.

The Allison Mignone Hall of Gems and Minerals will house this beautiful, eye-catching gem, and it’s already been grabbing attention since news of it reached the public domain.

This 11,000-square-foot section of the museum has been closed since 2017, but will reopen with spectacular improvements.

Visitors can interact with touch-screen displays that will deliver more insightful stories of how such minerals and gems came into existence on Earth, and what their purpose has been throughout human history in terms of technological uses.

Amethyst is classified as a semi-precious stone, and is highly regarded and respected for its spiritual and metaphysical properties.

It’s said to be a high frequency stone that works to eliminate dark energy from a persons aura which strengthens, calms and protects a person from negative influences.

Visitors to the museum will have an immersive experience as they get a chance to see various other huge rocks enhanced with luminous green and orange lighting.

You can still catch a glimpse of the 632-carat Patricia emerald and the 563-carat sapphire, known as the “Star of India”, as they remain on display just as they were prior to the refurbishment.

Another room, called the “Beautiful Creatures”, will display an array of jewelry by Bulgari, Tiffany and Cartier.

Also on display are other rocks, such as as the 9-pound garnet which was discovered underneath the busy streets of Manhattan in 1885. Like amethyst, this stone is said to enhance one’s strength and self-empowerment.

Who would have thought that a visit to a museum could be more than just a day out?

Simply standing next to this giant amethyst could be very beneficial to your well-being.

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